Tag : Restaurant Industry

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Interview With Brett Ireland – CEO Of Bear Hill Brewing

In this episode we interview Brett Ireland, CEO of Bear Hill Brewing. Bear Hill Brewing owns brewery restaurants, they sell their beer across Canada, and they are currently distilling and aging spirits. We discuss Brett’s career and how Bear Hill has fared over the last year, and why they are so optimistic about the future.

To learn more about Bear Hill Brewing: albeerta.com/

Listen below or subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.

https://soundcloud.com/orderupshow/43-interview-with-brett-ireland-ceo-of-bear-hill-brewing

OrderUp Interview with Chief People Office for Riot Hospitality Group

Tommy talks to Taylor Bell of Riot Hospitality Group about the state of the industry today and going forward. How they have managed through the pandemic and more.

Check it out below or subscribe through your favorite podcast app.

https://soundcloud.com/orderupshow/36-interview-with-taylor-bell

Interview with Chef Keith Jones – Renaissance Man

This is an interview with Chef Keith Jones. Keith and I have known each other since 1994 when I worked with him at The Metropolitan Club in Englewood Colorado. This is a great interview with Keith who has done and continues to do a little of everything in the hospitality business. We touch on the importance of mentors and a lot of other great topics in the business. I think a lot of you will like this episode because Keith has as expanded his horizons out of the restaurants but stayed in food service.

Audio Blog – Interview with Doug Davis, COO BEC Group

 

On this episode of OrderUp – The Restaurant Ops Show Tommy interviews Doug Davis, COO and Co-Founder of the BEC Group.

Doug shares his journey in the restaurant industry from starting out at McDonald’s as a kid and meeting the Zaxby’s owners while waiting tables to where he is now with the BEC Group. Check it out below.

Podcast – Ari Weinzweig visits the OrderUp Podcast

Ari Weinzweig fell into the restaurant industry in the early 80’s because he didn’t want to move home after college and wasn’t particularly fond of driving a cab.

His business started out with a deli and has now grown to a community of 15 businesses under the Zingerman’s brand including a mail order service, creamery, a farm, business training, a publishing company, and even an annual bacon camp. All these unique businesses reside in Ann Arbor, MI.

Ari is a very interesting guy with an interesting belief system that affects every aspect of his life, professional and non-professional. Check out his visit to the OrderUp Podcast last week below.

Podcast – Interview John Lewis Denver Food Group

Check out our 2nd interview podcast where Tommy sits down with John Lewis, Owner at Denver Food Group.

John has spent the last 15 years working in the Food and Beverage Industry, both CPG and Foodservice, in several different capacities, including Brand Management, Research and Development, Innovation, Culinary, and Purchasing.  Most recently he worked for Wendy’s and Heinz Foodservice.

John has a passion for helping companies develop  and refine their positioning to ensure they are staying relevant and differentiated.

Denver Food Group helps their clients build the most craveable products in the world while remaining affordable.  By combining culinary experience and research experience, Denver Food Group are able to give greater direction to Marketing and Product Development teams in the Food and Beverage Industry.

Audio Blog – Grow Restaurant Sales Through Better Operations

Below is the audio version of our very popular blog, The Only Way to Sustainably Grow Restaurant Sales is Through Better Operations.

Subscribe to our podcast Order Up – The Restaurant Ops Show on SoundCloud, iTunes, Stitcher, and Tunein.

Audio Blog – Interview with Ryan Gromfin The Restaurant Boss

The first Order Up – The Restaurant Ops Show interview is with The Restaurant Boss, Ryan Gromfin.

Ryan has vast experience in the industry and helps thousands of restaurant operators on a daily basis run better restaurants. He’s a great interview. Check it out below.

Subscribe to our podcast on the popular services: SoundCloud, iTunes, Stitcher, Tunein.

Diagnosing Falling or Stagnant Sales

Falling Sales Image

Too many restaurant operators mistake marketing problems for operations problems.  They look at falling or stagnant sales, and they think I’ve got to increase marketing spend to get my sales back up.  How do you know if your falling sales are a marketing problem or operations problem?  Here are a couple of questions you can ask yourself to help you determine the cause.

  • Have I recently changed my marketing spend?
  • Have I recently changed how I’m marketing?
  • How are my online reviews? Are they getting better or worse?
  • Have I recently increased my prices?
  • Is there a new competitor in your area that is affecting your business?
    • Be careful in just blaming competition, it is very rare that a competitor can put you out of business overnight; people want to blame outside forces vs. taking responsibility for their issues.
    • Having said that if a newer better mall or dining area opens up and you are in the old one, that can be an issue, and you may need to consider moving, opening a second location, or asking for some rent relief.
    • If it is a competitor, then you have to focus on beating them in the marketplace with service and value.
  • Have you recently lost a key team member?
  • Are my comps going up?
  • Are my complaints going up?
  • Does your food taste as good as it did six months ago?
  • Am I experiencing higher than normal staff turnover?
  • What was your most recent health inspection score; was it higher or lower than your previous score?

If you have made major changes to your marketing program, that may be the cause of your sales stagnation.  If you have recently stopped couponing or changed/stopped advertising then you may truly have a marketing problem.  The easiest solution, if you made a change, is to go back to the old way of doing things if that was working for you.

If you can’t go back to what was working before than solving a marketing problem takes patience, and it takes a plan.  Don’t just spend money to spend money that doesn’t work.  You may need to make a change in your marketing channel, change in ad’s, or an increase in marketing spend.  You should always be looking for an ROI in every dollar that you spend on marketing.  In theory, marketing should pay for itself so increasing effective marketing spend should pay for itself with sales increases.

If you have determined that your issue isn’t marketing, then you may have an operations problem.  Operations problems are good and bad.  The good part of an operations problems is that running better operations are completely within your control.  The bad part of operations problems is that fixing them can be hard and take patience and consistency.

The first thing you need to do is figure out who or what is the cause of your issues.  In restaurant’s most of your operations problems come from a team member(s) who is either doing something wrong or who has a bad attitude.  It’s not like there is a restaurant machine and it can go on the fritz, we are a people business, and almost everything that we do involves people.

If it’s a training issue, that is easy to fix with a little training.  If it’s a people issue, those are harder to deal with quickly.  I’m not an hr expert, but I can tell you this.  You need to decisively, and legally, deal with any people issues quickly.  One bad team member can wreck an entire operation, they are like little cancers and must be dealt with swiftly and decisively.  Start a 3 step process of coaching them up, if they resist or don’t change, then they need to go before they do more damage to your business.

Every bad guest review on Yelp can cost your restaurant 30, potential customers.  In my experience, I have coached several employees back from the brink but the 80/20 rule is in full effect and for every two employees that I coached up, eight employees ended up firing themselves.  There is something about people when they make up their mind, and either consciously or unconsciously they fire themselves.

Ultimately when you identify that you have an operational problem, you need to get back to basics and fix it as quickly as possible.  Once it is fixed, it can be a long slog to get back to growing sales.  It goes back to being an experience by experience battle.  Every good experience earns you back a little goodwill, and every bad one erodes it.

One of the best ways to drive operational consistency is to put in systems and hold your team accountable to following them every shift.  Management by checklists with follow-up is one of the fastest, cheapest, and easiest systems to implement.  Checklists drive consistency shift-to-shift and better operations.

To see a list of the checklists that every restaurant should be doing, I invite you to check out this other blog post.

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