Author : Tommy Yionoulis

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Using Daily Checklists on the OpsAnaltiica Platform as Field Team Force Multiplier

The traditional field structure in multi-unit restaurant organizations starts at the restaurant level and goes to an Area Mgr or Director, eventually rolling up to a VP of Ops and COO. For bigger organizations, there is obviously going to be more layers of management between the store and top people.

The person with the hardest job in the management structure is the Area Manager. They have the most direct responsibility; when I worked at Quiznos, our Field Business Leaders had around 50 restaurants each. They were directly responsible for these locations with very little actual control.

Even on a great day as an area manager, you may only be able to visit a couple of restaurants for an hour or two. Forget it; if your patch is spread out over a large geographic area, you might not visit some of your restaurants more than one time per quarter.

The area managers role has also expanded over time. Area managers were originally there to provide operations supervision. Assist the store level managers to execute better, conduct some training, make sure that the restaurants were following the corporate standards.

In a lot of chains, area managers are expected to handle the ops roles from above and to be franchise salespeople, auditors, tech experts, new store openers, etc..

The Area Manager’s role and patch size have continued to expand over time, and it is becoming harder and harder for them to make a difference at the restaurant level.

I could write a whole other blog on area managers being used as franchisor salespeople and auditors. Those two roles are in direct contrast to each other, and the incentives are misaligned.

One last point on area managers, they are expensive. The median salary, bonus, and benefit cost of an area manager in Denver, CO is $146K. Now if they have to travel for work or they get a car, you can add another 25 to 50K to that number.

Regional Restaurant Manager from Salary.com

What is one way we can help area managers be more effective?
We need to give them the management tools that allow them effectively manage their territory.

Area managers need systems that give them real-time visibility into their store’s operations and financials. The POS systems can provide you with the daily sales numbers from each of your locations.

The issue has always been in getting real-time restaurant operations data that would allow an area manager to see what is happening in all of their restaurants; this has always been a problem in the past because daily operations checklists and audits are manual and in most restaurants still on paper.

That is where the OpsAnalitica Platform comes into save the day. When our platform is deployed in all of your restaurants, your area managers will have real-time visibility into what is happening operationally at all of their locations. They will know when things aren’t getting done, they will be alerted to critical violations and will be able to hold their managers accountable right from their mobile device.

This is a game changer in multi-unit restaurant management because for the first time an area manager can see what is happening at every location right now. They can effectively follow-up with restaurants from anywhere. They can identify and help restaurants mitigate problems before they become forest fires.

Real-time field management is a completely new way to manage restaurants, it becomes a force multiplier for your field team, and it saves you money. As a matter of fact, it pays for itself in increased restaurant sales and the subsequent franchisee fees from those sales, check out our case study to see how much money using OpsAnalitica can generate in your restaurants for the franchisor and the restaurant operator.

Let me give you a real-world example to illustrate this fact. When we launched Torpedo Sandwiches at Quiznos, we inspected every location in our chain. For two weeks every field person and about ten corporate employees traveled the country and physically visited and audited every restaurant, over 4000 in total. What do you think that cost us?

The big things we were looking for:
– the restaurants were displaying all of the marketing materials
– the restaurant knew how to make the sandwiches
– the restaurants were ready for the promotion

With OpsAnalitica you can deploy a checklist that requires the end user to take photos of their menu boards, photos of the different sandwiches, you can gather readiness data on all of your restaurants. Remotely. You can see which restaurants have done this and haven’t done it before the promotion and then follow-up appropriately.

Another client of ours runs over 50 short checklists a day and restaurant readiness has gone through the roof.  Their field teams know when each restaurant is doing what they are supposed to through the day and are alerted when a restaurant is falling behind. A quick text message to the store is all that is needed to get the restaurant back on track.  If critical violations are discovered the field team member can investigate right from their phone and determine the best cause of action to take.

If you couple the OpsAnalitica Platform with a centrally managed checklist program, where corporate provides the mandated checklists and is consistently refining those checklists to address business goals, it becomes a potent operations combination. One of the features that make OpsAnalitica unique is that corporate can create core checklists but still allow restaurants and franchisees to build their own for their locations. Check on this blog on the OpsAnalitica way.

For area managers to be effective, they need the tools to manage their ever-expanding job responsibilities. OpsAnalitica can provide area managers with real-time ops visibility into their locations allowing them to more effectively manage restaurant operations in their territories.

Corporate can keep a finger on the pulse of their operations, creating a feedback loop and constant improvement cycle.

The program pays for itself from restaurants running better operations and will lead to better operations chain wide.

There is one last key to success to make this kind of force multiplier program work. You need complete system adoption. You can’t leave it up to restaurant managers/franchisees to decide for themselves.

If you don’t mandate the solution then you will be managing two systems, and it will not be sustainable nor will you reap any benefits. When everyone is on the platform that is when you get the economies of scale.

To learn more about the OpsAnalitica platform check out OpsAnalitica.com or check out our case study.

The OpsAnalitica Way – The Secret to Running Better Multi-unit Operations

Introduction

The OpsAnalitica Platform makes it easier to manage multi-unit restaurant organizations.

How is OpsAnalitica able to do this? We hold restaurant management teams accountable for running their restaurants according to procedures every shift, every location, every day. Which translates into better running restaurants, safer restaurants, and most importantly, more profitable restaurants.

Read our case study to learn more about the 4000% monthly return one of our clients is getting.

We do this by giving upper management real-time visibility into operations and a way to hold their teams accountable after the fact. This control allows management to oversee their restaurants while simultaneously being able to focus on growing their business.  This is truly revolutionary because in the past you couldn’t do both.

Running great multi-unit restaurant operations is all about upper management focus. Where your focus is directed is what is going to get done. If you are focused and setting all of your expectations on running great operations, then that is what is going to happen. If you are focused on adding new restaurants, then that is what is going to happen. With OpsAnalitica we become your consistent daily focus on running great operations, and we allow you to manage that in real-time remotely so you can also focus on growing your business.

This blog is going to explain our entire multi-unit restaurant management system and how it works. It assumes that you are going to use OpsAnalitica or another daily checklist software to accomplish your goals because attempting to do this without the visibility and accountability that software can provide is impossible.

Definitions

  • Centrally Managed Daily Checklist Program is a daily checklist program that is being centrally managed by the operations team.
    • The checklists are consistently being updated to reflect current operations priorities such as special events or operations focus.
    • These checklists are core to the successful daily operations of the restaurants from a safety and guest readiness perspective. They are the backbone of your operations procedures and are expected to be completed on-time every shift.
    • Checklist Compliance should be a major part of your quarterly bonus structure and bonuses should be reduced if compliance doesn’t meet expectations.
    • Common daily checklists: Mgr Opening/Closing, Temp Logs, Line Checks, Shift Change, Shift Logs, and daily cleaning tasks.
  • Site Visits: Site visits are quick critical checks that are conducted anytime someone who doesn’t work directly at the restaurant visits the restaurant.
    • These site visits should take less than 10 minutes to complete. You want them done every time so don’t make them too long.
    • They should consist of only the most critical FOH/BOH items.
    • FOH: Bathrooms, Cleanliness, Trash, Entry Way, Counter
    • BOH: Sanitizer Buckets, Walk-in, Hand sink, Storage, Food Safety
    • 5 or so questions FOH/BOH criticals to ensure that the restaurant is safe and inviting for guests.
    • Site visits are flexible and can be changed to reflect current ops focus.
  • Audits:
    • Audits are your big thorough scorecard; they are conducted between 1 and 12 times a year. Audits take 1 to 8 hours to complete, and they look at everything from the FOH/BOH.
    • Every restaurant gets the same audit so you can are comparing apples to apples.
    • Audits are how you identify larger operational trends across your restaurants.
    • Audits are an important part of scoring the operations of your restaurant chain.
    • The problem with audits is that some chains only use audits and the don’t track site visits or daily checklists, that is bad.

 

 

Here is how the OpsAnalitica Way works.

  1. Audit:
    1. Conduct store audits on every restaurant in the chain on your schedule.
    2. To learn more about setting up a World Class Audit System check out our blog.
  2. Analyze:
    1. Review the results and identify operational issues that you want to address.
    2. In the OpsAnalitica Platform, we have a report that will show you exactly where your individual issues are so you can put together your plan to fix them.
    3. Don’t just fall into the trap of its a training issue and start retraining everyone every time.  If you can ask employees how to do something correctly and they can answer the question, then they don’t need to be retrained.  Take some time and try to figure out why it isn’t getting done correctly. It could be an operations issue that needs some rethinking.
    4. Make a plan on how to fix the issue.
  3. Update Daily Checklists:
    1. This is where the idea of centrally managed checklists come from. You have identified your issue; you have a plan to solve it.
    2. Update your checklists to address the issue.  Checklists are your behavior change mechanism.  When you change the checklist you change the behavior of the managers in the restaurants.
    3. This is why a centrally managed checklist program is so key to the success of running multi-unit restaurants because you can orchestrate the daily activities of everyone from corporate and measure the results.
    4. This is also why you have to use a restaurant checklist platform, OpsAnalitica, to run the restaurants.  The Platform is what drives the accountability, data collection, and is what makes this whole system possible.
  4. Store Visits:
    1. Since most restaurant chains the only audit at most one time per quarter but field team members should constantly be in the restaurants the site visit is a perfect vehicle to measure how well the restaurants are pulling through initiatives.
    2. Ad 1 question to the site visit that will best capture the success or failure of your new ops initiative.
  5. Rinse and Repeat:
    1. This is a continuous improvement process. You are never done auditing, evaluating, and updating your procedures.

What we have created is a feedback loop that uses real-world data to help Operations teams to run better operations across multiple locations. When you do this right, you are building a culture of excellence, and you will be able to slowly and methodically raise and maintain your operations levels across all of your units by slowly cranking down on your own issues and addressing them promptly.

This is how using OpsAnalitica will help you run safer, more profitable, and better restaurants fulfilling your brand promise to your customers and helping you exceed your business goals.

If you want to learn more about the OpsAnalitica platform, click here to learn more about our free trial.

 

 

 

 

 

Creating and Executing a World Class Restaurant Audit Program

 

Restaurant Audits, OER’s, Quality Inspections are just some of the names that restaurant/hotel chains use to describe their location audit process. The names are different, but the intent is the same, get a fresh set of eyes on the location and measure how they are doing vs. the brand standards.

Remember the reason you conduct restaurant audits is that you need to protect your brand from yourself. Poor operations or unsafe restaurants can erode brand equity and lower sales for the entire chain. Food Safety is of paramount importance, and with our current social media-driven culture a foodborne illness outbreak can spread like bacteria over the web and can reduce sales by about 1/3 nationally and keep them there indefinitely.

For some chains, especially franchise systems, the conducting of the restaurant audit may be one of the few times a year a representative from the corporate office will visit the location so it can’t be overstated that you don’t want to waste that visit with an ineffective audit program.

When designing or updating your audit program, there are a couple of questions that you want to answer first.

  1. What technology are you going to use to conduct these audits?
  2. What are you looking to get out of your audits?
  3. How often are you going to be visiting the locations?
  4. Who is going to be conducting the audit?
  5. How comprehensive, how much stuff are we going to cover, in the audit?
  6. How long do you expect this audit and any subsequent coaching to take?
  7. How are you going to handle action plan items?
  8. Have you thought about Site Visits?

1. What technology are you going to use to conduct these audits?
You do not want to do your audits on paper, Google Docs or a combination of paper/Excel for scoring. Your audit is one of the most important interactions you have with the location, and you need to make sure you are capturing as much data as possible at the question level including photos and auditor comments and paper and excel are not made for this.

We have heard from some of our clients that have switched from paper to the OpsAnalitica Platform that we have cut their audit times by 75%, in most cases this results in several hours of busy work per audit. This reduction in needless paper pushing provides your auditor more time to interact with the restaurant teams coaching and training or if that isn’t their role it allows them to conduct more audits per day.

These are some features that you should be looking for when choosing auditing software.

  • Tablet/Phone/Laptop based software – you will use mobile devices to conduct the audit, but most people will want to use their computers to plan and manage themselves.
  • Geolocation – the ability to know that the auditor was on-site when conducting the audit.
  • Able to inspect offline – you won’t always have wifi at the location
  • Ability to take pictures
  • Ability to leave additional comments at the question level
  • Auditor Help Functionality – where an auditor can get more information about the standard at which a question is being judged or easily share the corporate standard with the location management team.
  • Flexible scoring
  • Tagging – question, and response tagging aids in deep dive analysis of the audit results.
  • Audit Report – this needs to be auto-generated by the system, printable is fine, but an online version is better as audit reports with photos and comments can be very long, and you want to make sure that people can enlarge the photos.
  • Action Plan Tasks that can be tracked and verified.
  • Auditor Functionality that allows them to plan their audits effectively
  • Reports that allow you to compare auditors to chain for auditor calibration
  • Gap and Question level reporting where you can look at the audit results across the organization to identify Operations issues that need to be addressed.
  • API – to pull app data out of the system and use in other BI tools.

To wrap of the technology portion of this blog, you want the technology you choose to be robust but also easy to use and bulletproof. When people are in the locations, they need to be able inspect and not be screwing around with their tech. Your field teams need a platform that will assist them in the planning, conducting, and follow-up stages of their audits. That provides them and the management teams their auditing with a seamless experience. From a corporate perspective, you want the software you choose to be flexible, easy to update, and you should be looking for a software partner that can work with you to refine your process over time.

2. What are you looking to get out of your audits?
We have found that a lot of people don’t have an answer to this question.

  • Are audits just an excuse for sending the field teams to the restaurants?
  • Are you looking to capture operations data so you can refine your internal procedures and run better restaurant operations chain-wide?
  • Are you just concerned with food safety or adherence to brand standards?
  • Are you auditing because that is what we do, but you don’t use the data unless an individual restaurant needs to be shut down for violations?

It’s ok, based off of your business model to subscribe to any of the above or something else. I would suggest that you get clear with your team about your stated audit goals. I am a firm believer that you should be auditing to collect data on your restaurants and to use that data to identify locations that put the brand at risk and to drive system-wide operational changes.

You should know what kind of results you want from the audits you are conducting because the answer should influence every other question.

3. How often are you going to be visiting the locations?
Audit frequency is a determining factor in a lot of different parts of your audit program. The fewer times a year you plan on visiting a location, the more comprehensive your audit should be. If you are going to be visiting more often, then you can have a shorter inspection, or you can vary certain sections of your audit so that you look at core critical issues every time and less important sections alternate between different visits.

Most restaurant chains that we have worked with audit between 1 and 4 times a year. Chipotle for instance is auditing 12 times a year, though we haven’t heard many restaurant companies conducting that many audits per year.

We have worked up a use case that can save a company a lot of money if they use daily checklists to augment their auditing program, they can conduct fewer audits per year on the top 20% of their restaurants without sacrificing brand protection or overwhelm their field teams. If you want to learn more about that, schedule a short call here.

Two other factors to keep in mind when determining how often you are going to be visiting.
1. How complicated are your operations? If you are a quick service chain with a minimal amount of on-site prep, examples would be a sandwich or ice cream chain; then you may determine that fewer audits are fine for your business because you have less risk based on the simplicity of your food prep and model.

Whereas if you are a full-service restaurant that is prepping most of your food on-site, you incur more food safety and quality risks, and therefore it may warrant more audits.

2. What is your geographic footprint? Are your restaurants in one city or are they spread out around the country? Are your auditors going to be traveling to audit the restaurants, incurring travel expenses for each restaurant they visit or do they live in their territory and can just drive to their locations to conduct the audit?

Travel expenses should be factored into determining auditing frequency. In some cases, it may make more sense to use 3rd party auditors when travel expenses dictate. This can also be affected by who is conducting the audit and what their role in the company is.

4. Who is going to be conducting the audit?

We have found that there are people in 3 different roles conducting audits in restaurants, they all have their pros and cons:

  • Field team member: usually an area manager or director.
  • Dedicated QA person: this person works for the brand, and their whole job is to conduct audits.
  • 3rd Party Auditor: like Steritech of EcoSure

Field team members are usually directly responsible for the restaurants they are auditing.  This is a very cost-effective model because the person is already on the team, they have intimate knowledge of the restaurants, and they are well versed in the operating standards of the chain, which allows them to audit and coach as they go.

The cons of using your field team to audit are that they aren’t impartial and there are inherent conflicts of interest in their scoring. For instance, a field team members performance is often tied to their patch of restaurants.  So by being completely honest and scoring restaurants appropriately, especially if the restaurant is underperforming, that score can reflect poorly on the field team members ability to manage their territory. In some cases, this could affect their take-home pay or bonus.

We know of many chains, Focus Brands and Quiznos for instance, where auditing is a small part of the field team members job.  A lot of their job is more sales related, selling franchisees on upgrades to systems, technology, remodels, etc..  Or just selling the franchisee on following the brand standards.  If your job is to sell and to audit, there is another conflict of interest where doing both parts of your job are at odds with each other, and most people will choose the path of least resistance.

Whenever you have conflicts of interest with your auditors, you can expect to get inaccurate audit scores, with the scores skewing up.  The problem with this is that you will have a false sense of security when it comes to the operational readiness and food safety aspects of your chain. You could believe everything is fine and then be blindsided by an issue.  Remember with data; garbage in is garbage out.

Dedicated QA people are a great way to combat the inherent conflicts of interest with using your field team people to conduct audits as QA people aren’t tied to the operating metrics of the restaurants they inspect.

The biggest cons to using QA people is that they often aren’t able to coach or train as well because they aren’t operators they are QA people.  There is also the inherent cost of having QA people on your payroll, having dedicated people who just inspect increases your audit costs in a lot of cases because you will still be sending your field teams to visit the restaurants.

3rd party inspectors are probably slightly less independent than QA people and more expensive per audit.  3rd party inspection services, like Steritech, field highly trained auditing teams that go around the country inspecting many different kinds of restaurants.  Because they have sophisticated equipment and training, they are very good at auditing.  Plus Steritech calibrates their auditors to brand standards and keeps them honest.

They can be very expensive, several hundred dollars per audit. You have to take cost into account when deciding to use a 3rd party vs. your own resources.  We have heard that Yum uses 3rd party auditors and pays for the initial quarterly inspection but if a unit fails the inspection, then the franchisee has to pay for a reinspection.

I’ve always been suspicious that 3rd party auditors could skew scores to ensure that their company keeps the contract. I don’t have any evidence of this and I’m sure the 3rd party auditing firms control this but there is an incentive to tell corporate what the want to hear so that they keep using the 3rd party firm.

5. How comprehensive, how much stuff are we going to cover, in the audit?

This goes back to everything we have discussed so far.  What are you going to do with the data, how often are you going to audit, and who is going to be conducting the audit?

You have to decide for yourself and your goals about how comprehensive your audit is going to be.  Here are some things that definitely should be in a comprehensive audit.

  • Food Safety – a must have for audits
    • This should include checking for all critical health violations.
      • Dishwashing – Dishmachine rinse and chemicals or 3 compartment sinks
      • Sanitizer Buckers
      • Handsinks
      • Proper food storage both dry and in the coolers
      • Labels on all food
      • Dumpster areas and rodent control
      • TEMPERATURES!!!!!!!
  • Restaurant Cleanliness and Maintenance – speaks to brand standards
    • General restaurant cleanliness
    • Wear and tear on building
      • Obvious signs of damage
      • Lack of upkeep
    • Bathrooms and dining areas
    • Kitchen cleanliness and organization
  • Food Taste
    • Pick random items, especially if they are prepared on-site and taste test.
    • Tasting food reduces comps when you catch your own mistakes.
  • Brand standards
    • Menu boards and POP
    • Guest service – observe transactions and rate the service provided
  • Administration
    • Proper employment records for all employees
    • Checklists and food safety documentation
      • Food safety documentation is one that often gets overlooked and not having this should cause a massive hit to audit score.
      • We have a pencil whipping problem in the US when it comes to food safety documentation, and it is unacceptable.
      • If you ever get someone sick at a restaurant, it is your documented adherence to food safety procedures that will give you the best chance of limiting your liability.  The FDA subpoenaed all of Chipotle’s logs a couple of years ago.  When you can’t supply that documentation, you are basically admitting to not following established best practices for food safety and therefore are more guilty.
      • You can effortlessly track and keep all your food safety records, track checklist compliance, and more if you use the OpsAnalitica Platform for daily checklists.
    • Required Employment Signage
    • Food Safety Certification Training

6. How long do you expect this audit and any subsequent coaching to take?

Audit time needs to be understood for planning reasons.  How many audits can you do a day? How many audits are you expected to do a month or a quarter?

We ran some numbers for a time savings business case a couple of years ago, and it is staggering how quickly audit time can add up.  As an example, if you can save 2 hours per audit and you do ten audits per month, that ends up being six weeks of time saved at the end of the year.

Understand for yourself how long these are expected to take so you can properly plan your audit program and make sure that your team can conduct their audits and do their other job functions if applicable.

7. How are you going to handle action plan items?

This is probably the most important part of auditing, and subsequently, one of the hardest things for auditors to do is to manage all of the action plan items that are created on audits. Action Plan items speak directly to the legal concepts of Due Diligence and Due Care.

In very lay terms, due diligence is doing your audit, self-policing your locations to make sure they are operating up to your brand and food safety standards.  Due care means having a plan in place to handle deficiencies and document that those issues are rectified.  The problem becomes when you audit your restaurants, identify issues, and then don’t take care of them.

We have all seen the news reports, the company knew this was an issue but didn’t do anything to fix it.  Knowing but not fixing greatly increases your liability but more importantly plays horribly in the media if it ever comes to that.

The basics for handling action plan items are:

  1. You have to identify action plan items.
  2. You should create one action plan task per item to ensure that all are handled.
  3. Assign the responsibility of rectifying the item to a person(s).
  4. Assign a due date for when the issue needs to be fixed.
  5. Verify, usually through pictures or re-inspection, that the item has been fixed.
  6. Document all of this in case the issue you identified caused someone harm.

Following up on action plan items is best accomplished by a task management program.  You can use email if you don’t have a task management program but email is very lax on enforcement, and you are more prone to miss action plan items.

We hear from our clients and prospective clients that completing action plan items is one of the hardest things they have to deal with because often time the auditor has moved on to their next audit and aren’t at the restaurant to supervise. Obviously, if you do several audits a week and you identify multiple issues per audit, it starts to add up very quickly.

I don’t know how other software platforms handle this but we have an explicit action plan task that can be created off an inspection report and links back to the item. You can track all of your action plan tasks in your inbox and you are notified as they are completed or if they are late.

It is great to have people fix their audit issues on the spot when possible.  Just like using tasks, you need a way to document the fix for reporting purposes. In our system, if you don’t want to create a task you can add additional photos and comments on the inspection report for documentation purposes.

Put together a system that allows you to easily assign and track that each deficiency that you identify is fixed in an appropriate time frame.  You open yourself up to a lot of liability if you can’t ensure that items are being fixed.

8. Have you thought about Site Visits?

There are three levels of operations inspections that chains should be doing to drive better operations.

  1. Audits: used to identify operating trends and restaurant performance
  2. Site Visits: quick critical only focused checklists that non-location employees complete every time they visit a restaurant.
  3. Daily Checklists: used to drive behavior and to document food safety procedures on a daily basis.

Site visits are seldom used and recorded by most major chains, I believe that their audit software doesn’t do a great job of facilitating multiple inspections, and this is a huge mistake.  Site visits are 10 to 15 question checklists that focus on the most critical operating standards from a FOH/BOH perspective.  They should be completed everytime a person from the restaurant chain, that doesn’t work at the location, visits the restaurant.

Site visits provide the following benefits:

  1. You collect more operations data:
    1. These are quick and take place at different times of the day so you can get interesting data about how well the restaurant is operating during the rush or right after.
  2. More flexible than audits:
    1. You don’t want to be changing your audits to constantly reflect current operational priorities because this dilutes their historic relevance. Instead, you can use site visits to gauge how well the restaurants are doing on current operational initiatives.

Using site visits in conjunction with your Audit program will help you understand how the restaurant is performing in between audits and provides very interesting operations data. It also allows you to identify and quickly address critical issues.

In conclusion, auditing is about protecting your brand from yourself. It is about ensuring that your restaurants are operating at or above standard. Audits are about teaching and coaching your team members, providing feedback, and holding people accountable.

Restaurant Audits are an integral part of managing multi-unit restaurant and hotel chains.  They provide us with a report card on how we are doing.  I highly encourage you to review your audit process using some of the standards I highlighted in this post. If you are looking for consulting assistance to review your audit program or restaurant audit software to conduct your audits on, please feel free to schedule a call with us at OpsAnalitica by clicking here.

We welcome the opportunity to discuss what you are currently doing, show you how our software could help you optimize your process, and to give you a quote.

 

 

 

The number one metric driving cloud software is…

It’s called Customer Success, and it’s going to be one of the major forces—perhaps the overall #1 driver—that will reshape the cloud-computing industry in 2018. Bob Evans

Bob Evans recently wrote a great article in Forbes about Customer Success and how it is one of the biggest drivers for cloud companies.  I highly recommend that your read the full article entitled: Why Salesforce.com, Workday And ServiceNow Are Obsessing Over This New Cloud Metric by clicking here.

Before I get into a high-level recap of the article, we at OpsAnalitica have known about the importance of customer success from day 1. That is why we offer the OpsAnalitica Managed Service and we are the only restaurant checklist and audit platform who does this.

Meaning we’ll administrate the platform for you and we do that for the same price our competitors charge to leave you swinging in the wind. You cannot find a partner that is more committed to your success than us because we’ll manage the software for you, if you want.

Article Recap

Bob quickly covers the history of enterprise software.

  1. In the past: 5 years ago, a software company sold you some software. You paid for it and it was your responsibility to get it to work in your environment which is where 90% of software problems occurred.
  2. Cloud computing: now you pay for a subscription to software, the software company does everything you used to do for you, like installing, hosting, managing, uptime etc. That is why everyone wants you to pay for the software every month because they are incurring costs on your behalf monthly.  Gone are the days that you bought software once and never paid for it again.
  3. Just having software in the cloud that is working all the time isn’t enough. Cloud companies have to focus on delivering the ROI that they promised when they sold you and that is Customer Success.

A customer success focus is a natural evolution of cloud computing.  Cloud computing solved getting the software to work and now we are turning our attention to getting you a return on your investment which should have been everyone’s focus from day 1.

The article goes on to interview several CEO’s and speaks with them about their takes on customer success.

I’m going to wrap up with this.  Your software vendors are your partners.  You are entrusting them with your information and they are promising you a return on your investment that will make your business better.  Hold your vendors accountable, choose your vendors wisely, and remember that we work for you.

I know that a lot of people miss the good old days when you could buy some software and you only paid for it once.  I think a lot of those people don’t remember how hard it was to get the software up and running and to keep it working.  I’m going to leave you with one thought last thought; I remember that the salespeople for a large sales company used to say, “don’t confuse sales with implementation” meaning your job is to sell at all costs and if what you sell is impossible to implement that is someone else’s problem, usually the customers.

Cloud computing is here to stay so are monthly software fees, it is truly a better way to go, and with the right vendors, it can make all the difference.

 

 

 

Finding, Hiring, and Keeping Great People Identified as Number 1 Restaurant Management Issue

 

We recently asked our email list of over 9,000 recipients “what was their biggest restaurant operations issue?” The unequivocal 1st place answer was:

Finding, Hiring, and Keeping employees.

Which sucks for me because I don’t have a magic solution to this issue, especially one that I can make money on.

To be a service to you guys, I went and found some articles about hiring and retaining for you and I will link to them below.

When I was a restaurant manager, here is what I used to do to hire and keep employees.  By the way, finding good employees is easy if you can keep good employees because you will get referrals and friends of your current team.

  1. Make work fun. Have fun with your team every shift.
    1. Have shift contests for the FOH and BOH
    2. Make Jokes
    3. Serve good food at the employee meal
    4. Don’t just include the servers of FOH, make sure all team members get to participate in the fun.
  2. Thank everyone and recognize people’s contributions constantly.
    1. Recognizing people is probably the most important thing you can do, just say thank you.
    2. I’ve found that people who feel appreciated are less likely to bounce when things get tough.
  3. Focus on your culture – live it and breath it.
    1. Every restaurant can have a cool culture.
    2. The culture is set by the management team and employees and then reinforced by management.
    3. Own it and make sure every decision and rule that you implement reinforce your culture.
  4. Conduct pre-shift meetings
    1. The pre-shift meeting is one of the most important things you can do to accomplish the first three things on this list.
    2. It is the only time that you get to communicate to your entire team together on a shift basis.
    3. Don’t be lazy and skip it because you are skipping the most effective team building and retention tool you have.
  5. Run a great restaurant.
    1. People forget that operations are the key to everything in the restaurant.  Do you know which restaurants in your area don’t have a turnover problem? The ones that are busy, because they are great restaurants, and everyone that works there is making money, staying busy, and feeling good about their job.
    2. You can do all the other things on the list, but if your restaurant is slow and people aren’t making money, or they are bored, the reality is, they are going to leave eventually.
      1. If they leave, you are never going to get out of the massive turn-over cycle, your service levels and food quality will steadily decline as you will always have a new staff, which will alienate your declining customer base until you eventually go out of business.
    3. Your restaurant operations are the one thing that you are in complete control of, and you have no excuse for not executing flawlessly every shift.

Here are a couple of articles about the restaurant industry’s turnover and hiring issues:

I know it’s hard out there in this market.  Implementing changes is always a slow process, and it requires discipline and consistency.  It is possible to thrive in this market as well.  Focus on the basics, your daily operations on a shift by shift basis.  Focus on controlling what you can control, which is everything in your four walls and ignore the outside distractions.  Take care of your people, and your customers and your business will grow.

If you want to learn how OpsAnalitica can help you run better operations on a shift-by-shift basis, go to OpsAnalitica.com

 

 

Emails Stink – Tasks Rule

How many emails do you get a day?

The average worker receives about 80ish emails a day and sends around 30.

Email was originally invented to get rid of paper interoffice memos. It has obviously morphed into so much more than that, it has become so ubiquitous in our lives that most of us can’t live without it.

Also, most people have used folders and labels and many other organizing schemes to turn email into things that it was never intended to do, mostly it is how we manage our to-do lists and assign tasks to people.

Email was never intended to be a task solution. As a matter of fact, it is a horrible task solution and the fact that you get so many emails a day just compounds its inadequacies.

If you want to get things done and have your teams execute then you need to use tasks instead of email.

The perfect task has the following attributes.

  • It is assigned to one or more people who are notified that they have something to do.
  • Tasks are one-to-one – ex: deep clean and organize the storeroom.
  • Tasks have a due date
  • You are notified when a task has been completed or is late.

So many of use email to assign work because it is right there and it is so easy to use but it doesn’t do any of the things we just mentioned as paramount for getting things done. Also, email is so free form that we often violate the rules of tasks for speed but we end up causing ourselves more headaches and follow-up on the back end.

Some common email task mistakes:

There is no accountability with email

As we said earlier, people get 80 work emails a day. New emails get buried in your inbox quickly. I don’t know how this is possible but emails get lost all the time, you know you read it but you can’t find it.

Also, we have all used the excuse that we didn’t see an email when asked about by a colleague or a friend why we hadn’t responded.  Being overwhelmed by the amount of email you get and missing things in email is so commonplace today that we all let each other off of the hook for the occasional lapse. Which is fine except for when you need something done.

With a Task system you assign a task to a person, they are notified that they have a task. You can easily track the tasks status and progress updates. In our system, you will get notified of a new task by push notification, email, or internal message.

Burry your task requests in a longer email

Have you ever sent an email with a bunch of to do’s or tasks and then none of it gets done? There is an expectation when writing an email that you at least put a person’s name in there and say and an introductory sentence.  The next thing you know your request or task is buried in a paragraph.  This makes it that much more likely that it won’t get done.

With a task, there is no requirement for a greeting or chit-chat.  You get a description of what needs to be done and when it needs to be done by.

Send a list of tasks in an email

Email doesn’t require us to be one-to-one when assigning tasks, as a matter of fact, it would be considered weird if you sent 10 separate emails with 1o individual tasks. This is probably the most common mistake of assigning work through email.  You create a list of things you want to be done but as soon as you add the second item, you lose accountability.

I can’t tell you how many times I have fallen into this trap.  I sent an email with a list of things to be done, the person did the first thing and then replied it was completed.  Completed what? Did you complete my whole list?  So now you go back and forth several times trying to get every item completed.

Tasks take a little longer to get started because you should create one task per request but they save you so much in accountability and follow-up that it makes the initial time increase completely worth it.

Emails don’t have due dates

We all get so busy that due dates just creep up on us.  They come and go and if you don’t have a reminder you will simply miss the day.  You can’t assign a due date to an email, so you are putting all of the responsibility for remembering that you wanted something done on yourself.

With a task system, you set a due date and it will notify you when things are due and tell all people associated with the task when it has been completed or if it is late.

Status & Updates get Scattered

With a task system, most tasks have a status.  In-progress, completed, etc.. You can use these statuses to figure out where everything you have assigned is currently at.  It makes it so much easier to manage when you have this type of visibility.

Also, updates can be tracked in the task program and therefore you can see everything that is happening.  With email people can reply back but then your email chain gets so scattered or you have so many emails that it becomes hard to find the update information.

As I stated at the beginning of this blog, email is probably the number one used business tool today.  It is great at what it does but it isn’t great at tasks. I would recommend to any of you who are managing a team to investigate moving from using email to using a task program instead and just using email for communication.  The productivity gains and reduction in stress will be worth the switch.

At OpsAnalitica, we have just released our task management functionality inside of the OpsAnalitica Platform.  You can now create action plan and ad hoc tasks and use the system to manage your operations.  If you would like to see the task management in action, please schedule a demo here.

 

 

Common Mobile Ordering App Mistakes

I’m one of those people who like to order ahead on an app and pick stuff up and bring it home. I’ve got two very frustrating stories of trying to do this recently and one great experience. In this blog I will outline what I was doing and the things in those experiences that were frustrating so you can avoid setting up a system that does the same things.

Story 1:

I wanted to order some breakfast and bring it home because I had a call starting shortly and I knew I was 5 minutes from the restaurant, so I thought I would order real quick then drive over to the restaurant and pick up my eggs and then run back home. I knew I would be cutting it close, but I also knew that if this all worked as intended that I could pull it off.

1st I went to a growing micro-chains website and went through the whole process of trying to order on their website. I got to the payment page, and you can’t order on their website unless you create an account.

Mistake # 1: Allow guest checkout. Not everyone wants to join your loyalty club or create an account. Plus you can still get their email so you can send them a receipt, so them not creating an account doesn’t hurt you from future marketing.

So then I created an account and all that entails. I had to enter my info, address, password, etc. There was an issue with their website, and it said gift card vs. credit card and I didn’t have a gift card, so I wasn’t able to order through the website.

Mistake # 2: Make sure your mobile ordering works as intended and don’t just test it with an account. Your test cases should include setting up a new account and then ordering and other use cases that a new customer might encounter.

Mistake # 3: Don’t make people fill out all their information when they are ordering from a mobile device. It is hard to type on mobile devices so just capture the bare minimum of data needed to complete the order and then use a follow-up campaign and incentive to get them to give you the rest of their information. A coupon for when you complete your registration is a perfect example of that.

I must admit that the idea for this blog was born on this day so instead of just bailing and going through the McDonald’s drive-through, which is right across the street, I decided to persevere and try using their app.

I downloaded their app, and it required me to register to order. I assumed that the account I created on their website would work on their app. WRONG.

Their website and app don’t sync, and they don’t make that clear. So I spent a couple of minutes trying to log into their app with my website credentials that I had just created before I realized this isn’t going to work and registered on the app where I re-entered all of my info into the account.

Mistake # 4: Have your stuff sync!!!!!!! Common really? I just went through and filled out all this info on your website, and it doesn’t work with your app.

The chain is probably using two different platforms for their website ordering and their app. They may even have a nightly sync set-up or something else. Sharing this kind of data isn’t hard and should be done on a real-time basis. Also, don’t have two different ways to order online, just have one, or use an integrated platform. Problem solved.

Finally, I got my eggs ordered, and I picked them up and ate them, and they were delicious. As I said earlier, I stuck this out because I wanted to see what the deal was but I wonder how many people would have bailed and done something else. I have also eaten at this restaurant several times since then and haven’t used their app since.

Story 2:

I was with my family, and we were up in the Colorado mountains and going to rent a pontoon boat for a 2-hour cruise around a lake. There was a national sub-franchise restaurant down the road, and I decided that we would order online and then pick up the subs and eat them before our boat ride.

I went on to their mobile ordering site and started to get everyone’s suborder, customizing each sandwich and getting drinks and chips, etc..

The website worked great until checkout. Then they wanted me to log in and create an account. So I did.

For some reason, once you create your account the system logs you out and you have to log back in. Well, it wouldn’t take my stupid password.

As a quick side note. Setting passwords on your mobile devices is way harder to do than on a computer because your phone auto corrects and most computers don’t. People think they typed one thing and the phone changes it to another and you have no clue what your password is because it is hidden for security reasons. I see this all the time with our app and new clients.

Mistake # 1: Provide a Show Password option, Amazon does this on their Audible app. It is really easy to do and helps you battle autocorrect.

Mistake # 2: Don’t have the website log you out and make you log back in after you create an account. The proper workflow would be to return you to your shopping cart to complete your order.

Returning you to your shopping cart is completely doable, and it shows that the developers of this online ordering platform have lost touch with what the customer is trying to do. They are trying to order sandwiches not trying to register an account. Who has time to go around and register themselves on different websites? Prisoners do, and that is it.

If you are purchasing this software for your restaurants, keep that in mind, your potential customers are trying to order, and anything that slows that down or gets in the way of that is very bad for your business.

I had to create two accounts before I could get the password to work. This also took me trying to reset the original password several times and not being able to log into the site to complete my order and pay for my food.

One positive thing about this experience. Is that I had multiple browser tabs open and when I finally got logged in my shopping cart was still there, and I didn’t lose everyone’s order. That would have been the straw that broke the camels back.

I finally placed my order; this took 20 minutes.

Then I drive to the restaurant, and when I get to the restaurant the tickets have been printed, and they are sitting next to the register. They aren’t on the line getting made. The time it took me to drive to the restaurants was probably 5 minutes.

I almost lost my shit, but I have a very strict don’t mess with the people who are making your food policy unless you aren’t planning on eating the food.

So when I walk-in and I have to tell the cashier that those are my orders and then she puts them on the line to get made I was pretty livid because I was on a clock and nothing about pre-ordering was helping me beat that clock.

Mistake # 2: The system told me when to expect my order, when mobile orders come in that are ASAP then you make them now. They have already been paid for so what the hell are you waiting for?

I got my order finally and got back and was late to my boat rental but the food was good, and everyone was happy.

Now for a good story. In full disclosure, Mici Italian, a micro-chain in Denver Colorado is a client of ours, but they also have a restaurant 5 minutes from my house. They have a great online ordering experience.

The app and their website are synced to each other. They remember your previous orders and from the app or the website you can one-click re-order a previous order. Their system just works.

They use hungerrush.com as their platform, and I have told them that their online experience is amazing. I have also recommended them to several of my neighbors, partly because their online experience is so good.

To sum these stories up. Your mobile ordering experience is an extension of your brand and your level of service. If ordering on your mobile website or app is frustrating that is equivalent to having a bad customer service experience.

It can even be worse than having a bad service experience in a restaurant because you may not even know about the issue and have no way of saving the experience. I believe that most people would not have completed these purchases.

I have said this in other blogs, but everyone in the industry is selling mobile ordering and delivery as these magic bullets that can rescue falling same-store sales numbers. At a 30,000 foot level, they make sense.

What no one wants to talk about is the new levels of complexity that get added to your business. It’s not just another order coming in; it requires IT, and technology skills, additional management training, and a whole new set of potential fail points both from a technology and customer service perspective.

What I would say is don’t rush into these platforms and services but to do a lot of competitive research and see what you like and what you don’t like and bring people into your organization that knows how to execute this stuff at a high level.

New sales channels can help grow your business but if the complexity of executing those sales channels creates bad customer interactions those sales get negated quickly.

Interview with Chef Keith Jones – Renaissance Man

This is an interview with Chef Keith Jones. Keith and I have known each other since 1994 when I worked with him at The Metropolitan Club in Englewood Colorado. This is a great interview with Keith who has done and continues to do a little of everything in the hospitality business. We touch on the importance of mentors and a lot of other great topics in the business. I think a lot of you will like this episode because Keith has as expanded his horizons out of the restaurants but stayed in food service.

Really Know Your Customers And What They Want

In this interview, we talk with Rob Siegal who owns Trajectory Insights, a consumer marketing and branding firm. He talks about how brands use this information to make more informed decisions and change themselves to stay relevant with their current and aspirational customers. www.trajectory-insights.com/

Trajectory Insights About Us: Trajectory Insights uses both data-driven quantitative and deep understanding qualitative research approaches to provide actionable growth strategies and tactics based on consumer and customer behaviors to set our clients on growth paths.